Can somebody post the DCI Floor Rules?

Discussion in 'Rules Questions' started by Notepad, Jun 26, 2004.

  1. Notepad Seffy Sefro

    I'm having trouble downloading the dci flood rules from www.thedci.com

    What I am trying to get is the DCI Floor Rules (general ones) as well as the specific Magic the Gathering rules. Working on an article and could really use a good reading of them.

    Can somebody who can access these files cut and paste the text in this thread, please?
  2. Chaos Turtle Demiurgic CPA Member, Admin Assistant

    MAGIC: THE GATHERING DCI FLOOR RULES
    Effective June 20, 2004

    Introduction
    The Magic: The Gathering DCI Floor Rules work in conjunction with the DCI Universal Tournament Rules, the DCI Penalty Guidelines, and the Magic game rules. Players, spectators, and tournament officials must follow these documents while involved with DCI-sanctioned Magic tournaments. Individuals who violate sections of these documents will be subject to the appropriate provisions of the DCI Penalty Guidelines.

    See Appendix A for a list of the changes from previous versions of this document.

    See Appendix B of the DCI Universal Tournament Rules for definitions of terms in this document.

    This document is updated quarterly. Please visit thedci.com for the most current version.

    100. GENERAL Magic TOURNAMENT RULES

    101. Format and Ratings Categories
    The DCI sanctions the following formats. They may be sanctioned as single, two-person team, or three-person team events.

    Constructed Formats
    • Standard
    • Extended
    • Block

    Vintage Constructed Formats
    • Type 1
    • Type 1.5

    Limited Formats
    • Sealed Deck
    • Booster Draft
    • Rochester Draft

    The DCI produces the following ratings categories:
    • Constructed (includes Standard, Extended, and Block formats)
    • Vintage (includes Type 1 and Type 1.5 formats)
    • Limited (includes all Limited formats)
    • Team Constructed (includes all Constructed team formats)
    • Team Limited (includes all Limited team formats)

    102. Authorized Cards
    Alpha cards (cards from the first print run of the core set) may be used in decks containing non-Alpha cards only if all cards are placed in completely opaque sleeves and only if the sleeves could not be considered marked.

    If sleeves are not used, Alpha cards may be used only in decks that consist exclusively of Alpha cards.

    Participants may not use cards from any special-edition sets or supplements, such as Collector’s Edition, International Collector’s Edition, Pro Tour Collector Set, World Championship decks, or Unglued cards.

    Note: Unglued basic land cards are allowed in sanctioned Magic tournaments.

    103. Card Interpretation
    Cards are interpreted using the appropriate card ruling section of the Oracle card reference. During sanctioned competition, players must refer to this version of a card to settle disputes concerning the interpretation of a card’s wording or powers. Card abilities are based on card text, not artwork.

    Players may not use previously or newly discovered errors or omissions in Oracle to disrupt a tournament or otherwise abuse the rules. The head judge is the final authority for all card interpretations, and he or she may overrule Oracle when a mistake or error is discovered.

    104. New Releases
    The Eighth Edition core set became legal for tournament play on September 1, 2003, the Mirrodin set on October 20, 2003 and the Darksteel set on February 20, 2004.

    The following card sets are also scheduled to release during 2004 and 2005. They become tournament legal for DCI-sanctioned tournaments on the dates listed:
    • Fifth Dawn Limited: June 4, 2004
    Constructed, Vintage Constructed: June 20, 2004
    • Champions of Kamigawa Limited: October 1, 2004
    Constructed, Vintage Constructed: October 20, 2004

    In the case of certain Limited tournaments, such as official Prereleases and Sneak Preview tournaments (include their side events), new sets are legal for use before the official Limited tournament legal date.

    These dates are subject to change. Any changes will be announced via an official DCI announcement that can be found at thedci.com.

    105. Participation Minimums
    The DCI requires participation minimums to be met for a tournament's results to be included in the appropriate set of ratings and rankings. For Magic: the Gathering tournaments, the participation minimums are as follows:
     For singles events, a minimum of eight players must participate.
     For team events, a minimum of four teams must participate.
    If a participation minimum is not met, the tournament is no longer considered DCI-sanctioned, and will not be included in DCI ratings. If participation minimums are not met for any DCI-sanctioned event, the tournament organizer should report the event as cancelled.


    110. Magic TOURNAMENT MECHANICS

    111. Match Structure
    Three is the default number of games in a Magic match, and tournament organizers must allow three games per match. If a tournament organizer chooses, he or she can run single-elimination final rounds as best three games out of five—this must be announced before the tournament begins. Match results, not individual game results, are reported to the DCI for the purpose of inclusion in worldwide ratings and rankings.

    Drawn games (games without a winner) do not count towards one of the three games in a match. The match should continue until one player has won the majority of games as long as match time allows.

    112. Match Time Limits
    The minimum time limit for any match is 40 minutes.

    The following time limits are recommended for each round of a tournament:
    • Constructed and Limited tournaments—50 minutes
    • Single-elimination quarterfinal or semifinal matches—90 minutes
    • Single-elimination final matches—no time limit

    The following time limits are recommended for Limited tournaments:
    • Sealed Deck—20 minutes for deck registration and 30 minutes for deck construction
    • Draft—30 minutes for deck registration and construction
    • Team Sealed Deck—20 minutes for deck registration and 60 minutes for deck construction
    • Team Draft—30 minutes for deck construction and registration

    The following time limits are required for premier events for which the finals are held on separate days:
    • In World Championships, Constructed Pro Tour events, and certain National Championships, the Swiss rounds will be 60 minutes; the final rounds will have no limit.
    • In Limited Pro Tour events, Swiss rounds will be 55 minutes; the final rounds will have no time limit.

    The following time limits are required for the following premier events:
    • Grand Prix events, Grand Prix Trials, Pro Tour Qualifiers, State/Province Championships, Regional Championships, JSS Challenges, and JSS Championship will use 50-minute Swiss rounds; and the final rounds will have no time limit.

    113. Play-Draw Rule
    The winner of a coin toss (or other random method) chooses either to play first and skip his or her first draw step or to play second. The winner of the coin toss must make this choice before looking at his or her hand. If the coin toss winner makes no choice, it is assumed that he or she is playing first. The player who plays first skips the draw step of his or her first turn. Each turn thereafter follows the standard order set forth in the Magic play rules. This is commonly referred to as the play/draw rule.

    After each game in a match, the loser of that game (even if the game loss was due to a penalty) decides whether to play first in the next game. If the game was a draw (there was no winner or loser), the player who decided to play or draw for that game chooses for the next game.

    114. Pregame Procedure
    Before a game begins, players determine who plays first (see section 113). This may be done any time during the pregame procedure before the players look at their hands. (Note that players are not required to decide who plays first before sideboarding.) The following steps must be performed before each game begins:

    1. Players may exchange cards in their decks for cards in their sideboards (only after the first game of the match).
    2. Players shuffle their decks (see Universal Tournament Rules, section 21). Note that players may stop shuffling to perform additional sideboarding, but must then shuffle sufficiently.
    3. Players present their decks to their opponents for additional shuffling and cutting.
    4. If the opponent has shuffled the player’s deck, that player may make one final cut.
    5. Players present their sideboards and put them in a clearly distinguishable place.
    6. Each player draws seven cards.
    7. Each player, in turn, decides whether to mulligan (see section 115).

    Once mulligans are resolved, the game can begin.

    115. Mulligan Rule
    Before each game begins, a player may, for any reason, reshuffle and redraw his or her hand, drawing one less card. This may be repeated as often as the player wishes, until he or she has no cards left in his or her hand.

    The decision of whether to mulligan passes between players following the order established in section 113. After the participant who plays first mulligans as often as he or she likes, the decision of whether to mulligan passes to the other player. Once a player passes the opportunity to mulligan, that player may not change his or her mind.

    116. End-of-Match Procedure
    If the match time limit is reached before a winner is determined, the active player (as defined in the Magic game rules) finishes his or her turn and five total additional turns are played. For example, time is called on player A’s turn. Player A finishes his or her turn. Player B takes his or her turn, which is turn 1. Player A takes his or her turn, which is turn 2. Player B takes turn 3, player A takes turn 4, and player B takes the final turn, which is turn 5.

    Players take any extra turns granted to them by card effects as they normally would during the course of the game, but any extra turn counts as one of the five end-of-match turns. Once the fifth turn is completed, the game finishes regardless of any remaining card-generated or end-of-match extra turns.

    If the game finishes before the fifth turn is completed, the match is over and no new game begins.

    If a judge assigned a time extension (because of a long ruling, deck check, or other reason), then the end-of-match procedure does not occur until the end of the time extension.

    117. Determining a Match Winner
    In Swiss rounds, the winner of a match is the player with the most game wins in the match. If both players have equal game wins, then the match is a draw.

    In single-elimination rounds, matches may not end in a draw. After the normal end-of-match procedure is finished, the player with more game wins is the winner of the match. If both players in a single-elimination tournament have equal game wins when the normal end-of-match procedure is finished, the player with the highest life total becomes the winner of the current game in progress. In the event the players have equal life totals (or are between games and the game wins are tied), the game/match should continue until the first life total change that results in one player having a higher life total than the other.

    120. RULES FOR CONSTRUCTED TOURNAMENTS

    121. Deck-Size Limits
    Constructed decks must contain a minimum of sixty cards. There is no maximum deck size; however, you must be able to shuffle your deck with no assistance. If a player wishes to use a sideboard, it must contain exactly fifteen cards.

    With the exception of basic lands (Plains, Island, Swamp, Mountain, and Forest [including snow-covered variants]), a player’s combined deck and sideboard may not contain more than four of any individual card, counted by its English card title equivalent. (Note that snow-covered lands are permitted only in formats that allow the Ice Age set to be used.)

    122. Sideboard Use
    Before each game begins, players must present their sideboards and allow their opponents to count the number of cards in their sideboards (face down), if requested. Players may not look at their sideboards during a game. The sideboard must be clearly identified and separated from all other cards in the play area. The sideboard may not be kept where it could be easily confused or switched with other cards.

    The deck and sideboard must each be returned to their original compositions before the first game of each match. Thus, cards transferred from a player’s deck to his or her sideboard, and vice versa, must be returned before the player begins a new match. If a penalty causes a player to forfeit the first game in a match before that game began neither of the players of that match may use cards from their sideboard for the second game.

    Before the beginning of the second or subsequent game in a match, players may change the composition of their decks by exchanging cards from their decks for cards in their sideboards. Any card exchanges between decks and sideboards must be made on a one-for-one basis to ensure that the sideboards remain at exactly fifteen cards at all times. There are no restrictions on the number of cards a player may exchange this way as long as one card from the deck is traded for one in the sideboard.

    125. Standard-Format Deck Construction
    The following card sets are permitted in Standard tournaments:
    • Eighth Edition
    • Onslaught (leaves Standard format October 20, 2004)
    • Legions (leaves Standard format October 20, 2004)
    • Scourge (leaves Standard format October 20, 2004)
    • Mirrodin
    • Darksteel
    • Fifth Dawn -- effective June 20, 2004
    • Champions of Kamigawa -- effective October 20, 2004

    Card sets rotate into the Standard environment on the dates noted in section 104. Card sets rotate out of Standard, however, in blocks. A large expansion and its two small expansions—essentially a year of Magic expansions—enter Standard play as a new block when the large expansion rotates into the environment.

    Example: The Onslaught block rotated into the Standard environment when the Onslaught set became legal for play. The Legions and Scourge sets are Onslaught block expansions and are legal in Standard. The Onslaught, Legions, and Scourge sets will rotate out of Standard together when the large expansion after Mirrodin (Champions of Kamigawa) enters play on October 20, 2004 -- two years after the Onslaught set was introduced to the environment.

    The following card is banned in Standard tournaments:
    • Skullclamp -- effective June 20, 2004

    126. Extended-Format Deck Construction
    New card sets are allowed in Extended tournaments as described in section 104.

    The following card sets are permitted in Extended tournaments:
    • Classic (Sixth Edition)
    • Seventh Edition
    • Eighth Edition
    • Tempest
    • Stronghold
    • Exodus
    • Urza’s Saga
    • Urza’s Legacy
    • Urza’s Destiny
    • Mercadian Masques
    • Nemesis
    • Prophecy
    • Invasion
    • Planeshift
    • Apocalypse
    • Odyssey
    • Torment
    • Judgment
    • Onslaught
    • Legions
    • Scourge
    • Mirrodin
    • Darksteel
    • Fifth Dawn -- effective June 20, 2004
    • Champions of Kamigawa -- effective October 20, 2004

    The following cards are banned in Extended tournaments:

    • Ancient Tomb
    • Dark Ritual
    • Dream Halls
    • Earthcraft
    • Entomb
    • Frantic Search
    • Goblin Lackey
    • Goblin Recruiter
    • Grim Monolith
    • Hermit Druid
    • Lotus Petal
    • Memory Jar
    • Mind Over Matter
    • Oath of Druids
    • Replenish
    • Survival of the Fittest
    • Time Spiral
    • Tinker
    • Tolarian Academy
    • Windfall
    • Yawgmoth’s Bargain
    • Yawgmoth’s Will


    127. Type 1 Format Deck Construction
    Type 1 tournament decks may consist of cards from all Magic card sets, any extension of the core set, and all promotional cards released by Wizards of the Coast, with exceptions listed below. New card sets are allowed in Type 1 tournaments as described in section 104.

    Cards from the following sets are not allowed in Type 1 tournaments, or any DCI-sanctioned tournament, unless it has been reprinted in a Magic Core or Expansion card set:
    • Portal
    • Starter

    The following cards are banned in Type 1 tournaments:
    • Any ante card
    • Chaos Orb
    • Falling Star

    The following cards are restricted in Type 1 tournaments:

    • Ancestral Recall
    • Balance
    • Black Lotus
    • Black Vise
    • Braingeyser
    • Burning Wish
    • Channel
    • Chrome Mox
    • Crop Rotation
    • Demonic Consultation
    • Demonic Tutor
    • Doomsday
    • Dream Halls
    • Earthcraft
    • Enlightened Tutor
    • Entomb
    • Fact or Fiction
    • Fastbond
    • Fork
    • Frantic Search
    • Grim Monolith
    • Gush
    • Library of Alexandria
    • Lion’s Eye Diamond
    • Lotus Petal
    • Mana Crypt
    • Mana Vault
    • Memory Jar
    • Mind Over Matter
    • Mind Twist
    • Mind’s Desire
    • Mox Diamond
    • Mox Emerald
    • Mox Jet
    • Mox Pearl
    • Mox Ruby
    • Mox Sapphire
    • Mystical Tutor
    • Necropotence
    • Regrowth
    • Sol Ring
    • Strip Mine
    • Stroke of Genius
    • Time Spiral
    • Time Walk
    • Timetwister
    • Tinker
    • Tolarian Academy
    • Vampiric Tutor
    • Voltaic Key
    • Wheel of Fortune
    • Windfall
    • Yawgmoth’s Bargain
    • Yawgmoth’s Will


    128. Type 1.5 Format Deck Construction
    Type 1.5 tournament decks may consist of cards from all Magic card sets, any extension of the core set, and all promotional cards released by Wizards of the Coast. New card sets are allowed in Type 1.5 tournaments as described in section 104. The Banned List for Type 1.5 tournaments consists of all cards from Banned List and Restricted List for the Type 1 format.

    Cards from the following sets are not allowed in Type 1.5 tournaments, or any DCI-sanctioned tournament, unless it has been reprinted in a Magic Core or Expansion card set:
    • Portal
    • Starter

    The following cards are banned in Type 1.5 tournaments:

    • Any ante card
    • Ancestral Recall
    • Balance
    • Black Lotus
    • Black Vise
    • Braingeyser
    • Burning Wish
    • Channel
    • Chaos Orb
    • Chrome Mox
    • Crop Rotation
    • Demonic Consultation
    • Demonic Tutor
    • Doomsday
    • Dream Halls
    • Earthcraft
    • Enlightened Tutor
    • Entomb
    • Fact or Fiction
    • Falling Star
    • Fastbond
    • Fork
    • Frantic Search
    • Grim Monolith
    • Gush
    • Library of Alexandria
    • Lion’s Eye Diamond
    • Lotus Petal
    • Mana Crypt
    • Mana Vault
    • Memory Jar
    • Mind Over Matter
    • Mind Twist
    • Mind’s Desire
    • Mox Diamond
    • Mox Emerald
    • Mox Jet
    • Mox Pearl
    • Mox Ruby
    • Mox Sapphire
    • Mystical Tutor
    • Necropotence
    • Recall
    • Regrowth
    • Sol Ring
    • Strip Mine
    • Stroke of Genius
    • Time Spiral
    • Time Walk
    • Timetwister
    • Tinker
    • Tolarian Academy
    • Vampiric Tutor
    • Voltaic Key
    • Wheel of Fortune
    • Windfall
    • Yawgmoth’s Bargain
    • Yawgmoth’s Will



    129. Block Format Deck Construction
    The DCI sanctions a series of Constructed formats called Block formats. Each Block format consists of a maximum of three expansions (one large expansion and the two small expansions associated with it).

    The DCI sanctions the following Block formats:
    • Mirrodin Block (Mirrodin, Darksteel, Fifth Dawn)
    • Onslaught Block (Onslaught, Legions, Scourge)
    • Odyssey Block (Odyssey, Torment, Judgment)
    • Invasion Block (Invasion, Planeshift, Apocalypse)
    • Masques Block (Mercadian Masques, Nemesis, Prophecy)
    • Urza Block (Urza’s Saga, Urza’s Legacy, Urza’s Destiny)
    • Tempest Block (Tempest, Stronghold, Exodus)
    • Mirage Block (Mirage, Visions, Weatherlight)
    • Ice Age Block (Ice Age, Alliances, Homelands)

    The following card is banned in Mirrodin block tournaments:
    • Skullclamp -- effective June 20, 2004

    There are no banned cards in Onslaught block tournaments.

    There are no banned cards in Odyssey block tournaments.

    There are no banned cards in Invasion block tournaments.

    The following cards are banned in Masques block tournaments:
    • Lin Sivvi, Defiant Hero
    • Rishadan Port

    The following cards are banned in Urza block tournaments:
    • Gaea’s Cradle
    • Memory Jar
    • Serra’s Sanctum
    • Time Spiral
    • Tolarian Academy
    • Voltaic Key
    • Windfall

    The following card is banned in Tempest block tournaments:
    • Cursed Scroll

    The following card is banned in Mirage block tournaments:
    • Squandered Resources

    The following cards are banned in Ice Age block tournaments:
    • Amulet of Quoz
    • Thawing Glaciers
    • Timmerian Fiends
    • Zuran Orb

    130. RULES FOR LIMITED TOURNAMENTS

    131. Deck-Size Limits
    Main decks must contain a minimum of forty cards. There is no maximum deck size. All cards a player received but is not using in his or her main deck become that player’s sideboard.

    Players are not restricted to four of any one card in Limited tournament play.

    132. Sideboard Use
    Any drafted or opened cards not used in a player’s Limited deck function as his or her sideboard. Players may not look at their sideboards during a game.

    Before the beginning of the second or subsequent game in a match, players may change the composition of their decks by exchanging cards from their decks for cards in their sideboards. Players can also request additional land at this time. There are no restrictions on the number of cards a player may exchange this way as long as the main deck contains at least forty cards. Cards do not need to be exchanged on a one-for-one basis.

    133. Materials Provided
    Tournament organizers and/or the head judge may choose to provide basic lands for players to use during the tournament. If the organizer provides basic lands, he or she must make available the same amount of land cards to each player. Organizers must announce before and during event registration whether they will provide players with access to basic lands. Organizers may require players to return the land cards when they leave the tournament.

    134. Rules for Sealed Deck Tournaments
    In Sealed Deck tournaments, players may exchange any number of nonpremium basic lands from the cards they receive in the sealed product for basic lands of their choice (provided by the tournament organizer). This exchange may take place any time between games in a match.

    135. Rules for Draft Tournaments
    Players may add as many basic lands to their decks as desired; no maximum is imposed. Extra lands are allowed for sideboards, and players may add basic lands to their sideboards any time between games.

    140. RULES FOR TEAM TOURNAMENTS

    141. General Team Requirements
    Each individual team must have unique, team-specific information, including:
    • a team name,
    • a team affiliation, if applicable (sponsor, school, retail store, and so on),
    • a team city,
    • a team state/province,
    • a team country, and
    • team members (with their respective DCI membership numbers).

    Multiple teams may have the same affiliation, city, state/province, and/or country.

    142. Team Names
    Wizards of the Coast reserves the right to disallow any team name that it deems offensive and/or obscene. Tournament organizers and certified head judges should discourage teams from registering team names that may be considered offensive and/or obscene. Once a team is registered at the professional level (meaning that the team has registered and played in a team-format Pro Tour event), that name is considered taken and may not be used by any other team.

    143. Team Composition and Identification
    A valid team consists of two or three members, as appropriate to the DCI-sanctioned team format (see section 101). A team is identified by the individual DCI membership numbers of its respective members. Individual DCI members may be members of more than one valid team.

    A team continues to exist as long as its respective members choose to identify themselves as a team. Any change in team membership (that is, the removal and/or addition of a member) constitutes a new team, with new team-specific information (see section 141). A team may change its name, affiliation, city, state/province, or country without becoming a new team.

    144. Valid Team Participation and Player Designation
    Sanctioned team tournaments are open to teams consisting of two or three members. Only valid teams of the appropriate size are eligible for a DCI-sanctioned team tournament. If a player drops or is disqualified from the event, the entire team is dropped from the event.

    Each team entering a DCI-sanctioned team tournament must provide the tournament organizer with its team-specific information (see section 141) when registering for the event. Failure to provide this information will result in the team’s disqualification from the tournament.

    Example: A sanctioned three-person team tournament is open only to teams consisting of three members; teams consisting of two members cannot compete in this event.

    Teams must designate player positions during event registration. For example, in a three-player team event, each team must designate who is player A, player B, and player C. Players retain these designations throughout the entire tournament.

    When two teams are paired against each other during the course of a tournament, the team members designated as player A play against each other, the team members designated as player B play against each other, and so on.

    145. Team Constructed Tournaments
    Event results for each DCI-sanctioned team Constructed tournament (Type 1, Type 1.5, Extended, and Standard) are merged into one set of Constructed ratings for each team size.

    146. Team Limited Tournaments
    Event results for each DCI-sanctioned team Limited tournament (Sealed Deck and Rochester Draft) are merged into one set of Limited ratings for each team size. Team Limited tournaments using any DCI-sanctioned Limited format must adhere to all applicable sections of the Magic DCI Floor Rules and DCI Universal Tournament Rules for Limited tournaments.

    147. Team Rochester Draft Tournaments
    Team Rochester events require teams of three players each, and two teams are seated at each table for the draft. Team members sit opposite the opposing team’s player with the same designation. (For example, in a three-person team event, players sit around the table clockwise in this order: 1A, 1B, 1C, 2A, 2B, 2C.)

    During the draft, talking is not allowed. However, nonverbal signals such as pointing and gesturing are permitted.

    The winner of a coin toss (or other random method) chooses either to pick first or to allow the other team to pick first. The “B” player of the team that picks first will lay out the first pack. All fifteen cards are drafted from the pack, but otherwise the draft follows the standard Rochester Draft rules for timing and active-player rotation (see the Universal Tournament Rules, sections 76 and 77).

    Example: Team 1 and Team 2 are seated around a table. They are numbered 1A-1B-1C-2A-2B-2C in a clockwise order. Team 2 wins the coin toss, and the members of Team 2 choose to let Team 1 pick first. The active player for the first pack is Player 1B. The first booster pack for Player 1B is opened and placed face up in front of Player 1B. After the 30-second review period has expired, the draft order is as follows:

    Player 1B—card 1 Player 1A—card 6 Player 1C—card 11
    Player 1C—card 2 Player 1A—card 7 Player 1B—card 12
    Player 2A—card 3 Player 2C—card 8 Player 1B—card 13
    Player 2B—card 4 Player 2B—card 9 Player 1C—card 14
    Player 2C—card 5 Player 2A—card 10 Player 2A—card 15


    148. Team Sealed Deck Tournaments
    Teams are issued sealed product based on which expansions have been released in the current block.

    Three-Person Team Events
    Each team receives two tournament packs and four boosters. The tournament packs will always be from the large expansion. If no small expansions have yet been released, then the boosters must be from the large expansion. If the first small expansion has been released, then the four boosters must be from the first small expansion. If the second small expansion has been released, then two boosters must be from the first small expansion, and two boosters must be from the second small expansion.

    Two-Person Team Events
    Each team receives one tournament pack and five boosters. The tournament pack will always be from the large expansion. If no small expansions have been released, then the boosters must be from the large expansion. If the first small expansion has been released, then one booster must be from the large expansion and four boosters must be from the first small expansion. If the second small expansion has been released, then one booster must be from the large expansion, two boosters must be from the first small expansion, and two boosters must be from the second small expansion.

    All cards must be assigned to a player, and each deck must be assigned its own sideboard. All decks must contain a minimum of forty cards. Any number of the remaining cards may be assigned as a sideboard to any player. Players may add as many lands as they need at the start of the tournament or between games.


    APPENDIX A— CHANGES FROM PREVIOUS VERSIONS

    Changes from April 1, 2004 version
    Section 104: New releases updated.
    Section 105: Participation minimums moved from Universal Tournament Rules (no changes to minimums).
    Section 112: Time limits changed (Minimum time limit for match round changed from 50 to 40 minutes. Recommended time for rounds is still 50 minutes.)
    Section 125: Card sets and banned cards updated.
    Section 127: Clarifies that Portal and Starter cards are not allowed in DCI sanctioned tournaments.
    Section 128: Clarifies that Portal and Starter cards are not allowed in DCI sanctioned tournaments.
    Section 129: Sets and banned cards updated.
    Appendix A: Section added.

    Published by Wizards of the Coast, Inc., P.O. Box 707, Renton WA 98057-0707, U.S.A. Magic: The Gathering, Magic, Wizards of the Coast, DCI, Pro Tour, Oracle, Portal, Starter, Ice Age, Alliances, Homelands, Mirage, Visions, Weatherlight, Tempest, Stronghold, Exodus, Unglued, Urza’s Saga, Urza’s Legacy, Classic, Urza’s Destiny, Mercadian Masques, Nemesis, Prophecy, Invasion, Planeshift, Apocalypse, Odyssey, Torment, Judgment, Onslaught, Legions, Scourge, Mirrodin, Darksteel, Fifth Dawn, Champions of Kamigawa, Betrayers of Kamigawa, Saviors of Kamigawa and character names are property of Wizards of the Coast, Inc. in the U.S.A. and other countries. ©2004 Wizards.
  3. Chaos Turtle Demiurgic CPA Member, Admin Assistant

    Universal Tournament Rules or the appropriate game’s DCI Floor Rules will be subject to the appropriate provisions of the DCI Penalty Guidelines and further DCI review.

    Note: Please see appendix B of the DCI Universal Tournament RulesAppendix B for definitions of terms in this document.

    Please see Appendix C for a list of the changes from previous versions of this document.

    1. GENERAL DCI TOURNAMENT RULES

    2. DCI-Supported Games
    The following games are supported by the Universal Tournament Rules:
     Duel Masters™ trading card game
     Dungeons & Dragons™ Miniatures
     Football Champions™ trading card game
     Magic: The Gathering® trading card game
    • MLB™ Showdown™ sports card game
    •NFL ™ Showdown™ sports card game
    • Star WarsNeopets® trading card game
     RISK 2210® board game
    • Subbuteo Football Champions™Star Wars™ trading card game

    If you do not have the appropriate game-related section of the DCI Floor Rules, visit the tournament section of the DCI website at thedci.com to download a copy.DCI Floor Rules for each of the games listed above are located at thedci.com.

    3. Player Eligibility
    Anyone is eligible to participate in a DCI-sanctioned eventtournament except for the following:
     • The tournament organizer of record
     • The head judge and any other listed judges of recordall other judges of the event (DCI certified and non-certified).
     Officials, staff or volunteers of the tournament (see appendix B).
     • Players currently suspended by the DCI. The current DCI Suspended Player list is located at www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=dci/suspended
     • Wizards of the Coast, Inc. and Hasbro, Inc. corporate employees and immediate family members (see appendix B).
     • Former Wizards of the Coast® and Hasbro corporate employees (until thirty days after their last days of employment at Wizards of the Coast or Hasbro)
     • Wizards of the Coast (including The Game Keeper®) retail store employees may play in Prerelease tournaments, Amateur Championships, Friday Night Magic events, and non-premier events.Hasbro. Also, former corporate employees may not play in Pre-release events until 6 months after their last day of employment with Wizards of the Coast retail store employees may not, however, play in any other premier event as defined in appendix B, or Hasbro.
    and they may not play in any events that take place in the stores at which they are employed.
     • Employees of companiesthat are responsible for organized play in a region may not participate in DCI-sanctioned play (for example, Hobby Japan, Amigo Spiel, Devir, and so on).Devir.)
     • Play testers and reviewers with significant knowledge of a card set may not play in Prerelease tournaments for that card set.
     • Other players specifically prohibited from participation by DCI or Wizards of the Coast policy (for example, already qualified players may not participate in Magic: The Gathering Pro Tour™ Qualifier tournaments).
     • Invitation-only tournaments, such as Pro Tour events, may have additional criteria regarding player eligibility.

    Players with questions regarding their tournament eligibility should contact the DCI Policy Manager at dci@wizards.com.

    4. Necessary Tournament Materials
    A player must bring the following items to a tournament in order to participate:
     • A visible and reliable method to maintain and record game information (tokens, score counters, pen and paper, and so on).
     • A valid and unique DCI number registered in the participant’s name. Note: New players must register for DCI membership at their first tournaments. Players may have only one DCI number. Tournament organizers must report any player using more than one DCI membership number. Should players find they have been assigned multiple DCI numbers, they should contact the DCI at dci@wizards.com.
     • Any materials specifically required for a particular tournament format, as required by the game’s DCI Floor Rules or the tournament organizer.

    Example: Players need to bring their assembled decks to Constructed tournaments.

    5. Wagering
    Players and tournament officials may not wager, ante, or bet on the outcome of any portion of a tournament.

    6. Publishing Event Information
    Wizards of the Coast reserves the right to publish event information such as the contents of a player’s deck as well as transcripts or video reproductions of any DCI-sanctioned tournament at any time (including during the tournament). Tournament organizers also are allowed to publish this information.

    Wizards of the Coast reserves the right to publish penalty and suspension information.

    7. Document Updates
    Wizards of the Coast reserves the right to alter these rules, the DCI Floor Rules of any particular DCI-sanctioned game, as well as the right to interpret, modify, clarify, or otherwise issue official changes to these rules, with or without prior notice.

    You can download these updatesDocument updates are available at thedci.com.

    10. TOURNAMENT RESPONSIBILITIES

    11. Event-Knowledge Responsibilities
    Competitors, judges, and organizers involved in DCI-sanctioned tournaments are responsible for knowing and following the most current version of the Universal Tournament Rules, the DCI Floor Rules for the appropriate game, and any other applicable regulatory documents, including the game rules for the appropriate game.

    12. Tournament Organizer Responsibilities
     The tournament organizer of an event is ultimately responsible for all tournament operations and event reporting for the event. The tournament organizer’s responsibilities include, but are not limited to, the following:
     • Selecting the site for the event
     • Providing all materials to operate the event (product at Sealed Deck events, for example)
     • Retaining all tournament results for one full year after the event’s completion
     • Reporting to the DCI all event results, including the winner,Reporting all tournament results to the DCI within eight days of the event’s completion
     • Staffing the eventStaffing the tournament with appropriate personnel (including finding an appropriate head judge for the event)(head judge, scorekeeper, etc.)
     • Advertising the tournament sufficiently in advance of the event date

    13. Player Responsibilities
     Players must follow the rules interpretations and guidelines for play set forth by the DCI, the head judge, and other tournament officials.

     Players are expected to behave in a respectful and sporting manner at all times.

     Players who argue with or fail to follow the instructions of the head judge or other tournament officials may beare subject to the appropriate provisions of the DCI Penalty Guidelines.

     Players arestill subject to the appropriate penalties even if a judge was present at the match at which the infraction occurred.

     Players are not permitted to waive penalties on behalf of their opponents. The judge must ensure that appropriate penalties, if any, are imposed.

     Players are responsible for maintaining an accurate rating. If an anomaly occurs in a player’srating and for informing the DCI of any discrepancies in their match history. If a player believes there is an anomaly in their rating, he or she should contact the DCI immediately at dci@wizards.com. refer to the DCI Appeals Policy, located at http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=dci/appeals.
     Players that do not fulfill their responsibilities as described above may be subject to review by the DCI; such a review may result in the suspension of a players' membership.

    Wizards of the Coast and the DCI reserve the right to suspend or revoke a player's membership without prior notice for any reason deemed necessary.

    14. Spectator and Press Responsibilities
    Spectators are expected to remain silent during matches and are not permitted to communicate with players in any way while matches are in progress. Players have the right tomay request that a spectator not observe their matches. All such requests must be made through a judge.

    Spectators and members of the press who believethat they have observed rules violations should inform a judge, butthey must not interfere with the match.

    15. Judge Responsibilities
    Judges have the responsibility to deliver fair, impartial rulings and to assist the head judge and other tournament officials in any area that is required to ensure a smoothwell-run tournament. Judges must take action to resolve any rulesfloor or game rule infraction(whether a violation of the DCI Floor Rules or the rules for the appropriate game) they notice or that is brought to their attention.

    16. Head Judge Responsibilities
    Officially sanctioned competition requires the physical presence of a head judge during play to adjudicate disputes, interpret rules, assign penalties, and make other official decisions. The head judge may, with the tournament organizer’s agreement, appoint any number of other judges to help in the performance of the head judge’s duties and to perform other tasks the head judge may require. The head judge is responsible for reporting all warnings and disqualifications issued at the tournament to the DCI, either directly or through the tournament organizer’s event report.

    The head judge andthe tournament organizer can be, but do not have to be, the same individual. The head judge is the final judicial authority at any DCI-sanctioned tournament (see section 15, Judge Responsibilities).

    Although it is beneficial, the head judge does not have to be a DCI-certified judge. Certification is available only to Magic: The Gathering judges at this time. For information on becoming a certified Magic® judge or finding a certified judge in your area, please contact the DCI judge certification manager at dcijudge@wizards.com.

    17. Appeals to the Head Judge
    If players should disagreea player disagrees with a judge’s decision, they are free tohe or she may appeal the ruling to the head judge. The head judge has the rightauthority to overrule other judges’ decisions. Players may not appeal to the head judge before the judge responding to the situation renders an initial decision. The head judge’s decision is final.

    If the Team Leader judging system is used, all appeals must still be passed to the head judge, whose decision is final.

    18. Lengthy Rulings
    If a judge uses more than one minute to make a ruling, he or she may extend the match time appropriately. The extra time must be clearly communicated and recorded immediately by the judge.

    20. TOURNAMENT MECHANICS

    21. Shuffling
    Shuffling must be done so that the faces of the cards cannot be seen. Regardless of the method used to shuffle, players’ decks must be sufficiently randomized. Each time players shuffle their decks, they must present their decks to their opponentsdeck to their opponent for additional shuffling and/or cutting. At a judge’s discretion, playersPlayers may request to have a judge shuffle their cards rather than pass that duty to their opponents.opponent, this request will be honored at a judge’s discretion. By presenting their decks to their opponents, players are stating that their decks are correct, legal, and sufficiently randomized.

    After decks are presented and accepted, any player who does not feelbelieve his or her opponent has made a reasonable effort to sufficiently randomize his or her deck must notify a judge. The head judge has final authority to determine whether a deck has been sufficiently randomized. The head judge also has the authority to determine if a player has used reasonable effort to randomize his or her deck. If the head judge feels that either the deck has not been sufficiently randomized or that a player has not made a reasonable effort to randomize his or her deck, the player will be subject to the appropriate provisions of the DCI Penalty Guidelines.

    To aid in randomization, atAt REL 3 and higher events players must always shuffle their opponents’ decks at the beginning of games. The head judge can mandate the shuffling of opponents’ decks at lower RELs (1 and 2) as long as he or she announces this at the beginning of the tournament. If a shuffling effect takes place during gameplay, place, players may shuffle and must cut their opponents’ decks after the shuffling effect is completed.

    Once playershave had the opportunity to shuffle and/or cut their opponents’ decks, the cards are returned to their original owners. If the opponent has shuffled the player’s deck, that player may make one final cut.

    22. Tardiness
    Players are expected to be in their seats when each round begins. Players arriving at their seats after the round begins may be subject to tardiness penalties listed in the DCI Universal Penalty Guidelines. Players who fail to arrive at their seats by the end of any round will be dropped from the tournament.

    At team events, if one or more members of a team are not in his or her seat by the end of the round, that team is automatically dropped from the tournament.

    23. Pregame Time Limit
    Before each game, competitors have three minutes to shuffle their decks and present them to their opponents for additional shuffling and/or cutting. This three-minute period includes sideboarding, if applicable, but does not include shuffling an opponent’s deck or resolving any mulligans—if the DCI Floor Rules for the game in question specifically allow mulligans. Any mulligans or shuffling of opponents’ decks must be done in a timely manner before games begin. Shuffling requirements specified in section 21 apply during these steps.

    If a player is subject to a deck check, that player will be given an amount of extra time equal to the timethat the check tookrequired plus three minutes.

    24. Midgame Shuffling Time Limit
    A reasonable time limit will be allowed for all shuffling and deck-searching that occurs during a game. In general, most simple searchesPlayer should be allowed thirty seconds, butseconds to conduct simple searches; more complicated searches may be allowed more time at the judge’s discretion.

    If a judge determines that a player’s shuffling time is excessive, that player will be subject to the appropriate provisions of the DCI Penalty Guidelines. Shuffling requirements specified in sectionSection 21 apply.

    25. Conceding Games or Matches
    Players may concede a game or match at any time within the following guidelines. The conceded game or match is recorded as a loss for the conceding player. If a player refuses to play, it is assumed that he or she concedes the match.

    The following actions are prohibited:
     • Offering or accepting a bribe or prize split in exchange for the win, loss, concession, drop, or draw of a match
     • Attempting to determine the winner of a game or match by a random method, such as a coin flip or die roll

    Players who engage in these actions will be subject to the appropriate provisions of the DCI Penalty Guidelines.

    Players are allowed to share prizes they have won as they wish, such as with teammates, as long as any such sharing does not occur as an exchange for the win, loss, concession, drop or draw of a game or match.

    EXCEPTION: Players in the final match of the single-elimination portion of a tournament have the option not to play their match. If both players of the final match agree not to play, one of them must agree to drop from the event (in order for prizes to be awarded). The DCI ratings of the players will not be affected because no match will have been played. The dropping player receives the second-place prize, and the other finalist receives the first-place prize.

    Example: Two players in the final of a Pro Tour Qualifier may agree to split the prizes (the travel award and the Pro Tour invitation), but this agreement cannot alter the results of the match. One player must drop from the event, leaving the travel award and the invitation to the player who did not drop from the event. That player is then free to split the prizes as agreed upon. The prizes will be sent only to the winner (that is, the finalist who did not drop); Wizards of the Coast will not send the Pro Tour invitation to one person and the travel award to another person.

    26. Withdrawing from an Event
    Players choosing to withdraw from an event must inform the scorekeeper before the pairings for the next round are generated. Players leaving the tournament after the scorekeeper begins pairing for the next round receive a match loss in the upcoming round and will be removed from the event after that round. Players who leave the tournament for a round or more are dropped from the tournament and may not reenter.

    Special rules apply to Limited events (see section 64).

    If a player withdraws from a tournament after a cut has been made, such as a cut to the Top 8 in a Pro Tour Qualifier, a player is not advanced to replace the player who withdrew.

    27. Intentional Draw
    Players may mutually agree to accept an intentional draw at any time before the match or game result of a Swiss round is submitted. This agreement should not be regarded as a violation of section 41. Declaring an intentional draw has the same results for competitors as playing to a draw. For example, if two players choose to draw their match during the Swiss rounds of a Magic tournament, each would receive 1 match point.

    28. Taking Notes
    Players are allowed to take brief written notes regarding the current match and may refer to those notes while this match is in progress. Players are expected to take their notes in a timely fashion. Players who take too much time will be subject to the appropriate provisions of the DCI Penalty Guidelines.

    During draft tournaments, players and spectators may not take any notes during the draft. Players may not refer to outside notes during the match. This includes notes from previous matches of that day.

    Cards in your deckused in a tournament may not have writing on their faces other than signatures or artistic modifications. Modifications may not obscure the artwork so as to make the card unrecognizable. AnyIf modifications thatto a card are deemedto be outside notes by the head judge will subject the playerto constitute outside notes or unsporting contact, the owner of the deck are subject to the appropriate provisions of the DCI Penalty Guidelines.

    29. Electronic Devices
    The head judge or tournament organizer may choose not to allow players to participate with electronic devices (such as cellular phones, headphones, pagers, and/or portable audio units) turned on.

    30. TOURNAMENT CARD STATUS RULES

    31. Cards Allowed
    Cards in a player’s deck must be produced by the game’s manufacturer or an official partner that is approved by the DCI. ThePlease refer to the DCI Floor Rules for the appropriate game will containfor additional information, if necessary.

    32. Card Interpretation
    The head judge is the final authority regarding card interpretations. See the DCI Floor Rules for the appropriate game for more detailed rules regarding how cards should be interpreted. If the head judge determines that a player is using non-English–language cards and/or misprints to create an advantage by using misleading text or artwork, that player will be subject to the appropriate provisions of the DCI Penalty Guidelines.

    If it is reasonably available, players may request access to the Oracle™ card text.

    33. Card Elevation
    Players must keep their cards above the level of the playing surface at all times, including during sideboarding. Revealing your hand to your opponent is not consideredto be a violation of the DCI Universal Tournament Rules.

    34. Proxy Cards
    The use of proxy cards is not permitted except under the following conditions:
     • If a card becomes accidentally damaged or excessively worn through play in the current DCI-sanctioned tournament, the judge may provide a proxy replacement card at his or her discretion or require the player to sleeve all of his or her cards before play continues.
     • If a card opened out of sealed product for use in a Limited tournament is misprinted, miscut, or otherwise damaged in a way that would cause the card to be marked, the judge may provide a proxy replacement card at his or her discretion.

    Players are not permitted to create a proxy. When a judge creates a proxy for a player, it is included in the player’s deck. The original card is kept close at hand during the match. When the proxy is in play, replace it with the original. When itthe original card returns to the player’s deck/hand, swap it with the proxy. This replacement method helps ensure that the opponent is able to clearly see the intended card and to avoid confusion.

    The term “proxy” includes counterfeit cards or any card that is not a genuine game card. Counterfeiters will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.

    35. Card Sleeves
    Players may use plastic card sleeves or other protective devices on cards. If a player chooses to use card sleeves, all cards in the player’s current deck must be placed in the sleeves in an identical manner. If the sleeves feature holograms or other similar markings, cards must be inserted into the sleeves so these markings appear only on the face of the cards.

    Once a match begins, a player may request that the judge inspect an opponent’s card sleeves. The judge may disallow a player’s card sleeves if the judge believes they are marked, worn, or otherwise in a condition or of a design that interferes with shuffling or game play. To avoid confusion, a card sleeve may also be used to mark a player’s card if the card is in an opponent’s playing area.

    36. Turned Cards
    If a card must be turned as a part of the game rules to denoteindicate a particular effect, it must be turned approximately 90 degrees or 180 degrees, whichever ismost appropriate for the game and / or effect.

    37. Game Markers
    Game markers, such as tokens or reminders of a game effect, may not be designated by cards with identical backs as the cards in a player’s deck if the deck is unsleeved. If the deck is sleeved, game markers may not have sleeve backs identical to those on the cards in the player’s deck.

    No game markers of any kind may be placed on top of or in a location that obscures a player’s deck. A judge may disallow the use of game markers that may cause confusion with regard to the state of the game or that are inappropriate or offensive in some manner.

    38. Deck Checks
    At all premier events and all events of REL 3 or higher, deck checks must be performed. For all events, the DCI strongly recommends that deck checks be performed and that a minimum of ten percent of decks are checked over the course of the tournament.

    40. TOURNAMENT VIOLATIONS

    41. Cheating
    Cheating will not be tolerated. The head judge reviews all cheating allegations, and if he or she determines that a player has cheated, the head judgehe or she will issue the appropriate penalty based on the DCI Penalty Guidelines. All disqualifications are subject tolater DCI review and further penalties may be assessed.

    Cheating includes, but is not limited to, the following intentional activities:
    • Receiving outside assistance or coachingor giving outside assistance
     Looking at opponents’ card faces while shuffling or cutting their decks
     Collusion to alter the results of a game or match (see section 25)
     Misrepresenting cards or rules
     Using marked cards/sleeves (see section 44)
     Drawing extra cards
     Illegally manipulating which cards are drawn from a player’s deck or his or her opponent’s deck
     Stalling the length of a turn to take advantage of a time limit
     Misrepresenting public information (point totals, statistics of cards in play, number of cards in a deck, and so on).
     Giving false or misleading information to a judge or tournament official

    42. Unsporting Conduct
    Unsporting conduct is unacceptable and will not be tolerated at any time. Judges, players, spectators, and tournament officials must behave in a polite, respectable, and sporting manner. In addition, players who use profanity, argue,Unsporting conduct includes, but is not limited to, using profanity, arguing with or act belligerently toward tournament officials, players officials or one another, or harassor spectators, harassing spectators, tournament officials, or opponents will beopponents, or failure to follow the instrcuctionsinstructions of a tournament offcialofficial. All incidents of unsporting conduct are subject to the appropriate provisions of the DCI Penalty Guidelines andwill be subject to further DCI review.

    43. Slow Play
    Players must take their turns in a timely fashion regardless of the complexity of the play situation. Playing too slowly or stalling for time is not acceptable. If a judge determines that a player is playing excessively slowly at any point during the tournament, the responsible player will be subject to the appropriate provisions of the DCI Penalty Guidelines.

    44. Marked Cards
    Players are responsible for ensuring that their cards and/or card sleeves are not marked. A card is considered marked if it bears something that makes it possible to identify the card without seeing its face, including scratches, discoloration, bends, and so on.

    If a player’s cards are sleeved, the sleeves are considered part of the cards, so the cards must be examined while in the sleeves to determine if they are marked. Players must use care when sleeving their decks and should randomize their decks prior to sleeving them to reduce the possibility of marked cards with a pattern.

    Any card that is cut differently from the other cards in a player’s deck may be considered marked if the entire contents of the deck isare not placed in nonmarked,unmarked, completely opaque card sleeves. For example, Alpha cards are considered marked if they are mixed into a player’s deck with cards from other sets at a Magic event. However, Alpha cards are not considered marked—and therefore do not have to be in opaque sleeves—if the entire deck consists of Alpha cards.

    If a differently cut card has caused its sleeve to become worn differently than other sleeves in the deck, that sleeve is considered marked.

    The head judge has the authority to determine if a card or series of cards in a player’s deck is marked.

    50. GENERAL CONSTRUCTED TOURNAMENT RULES
    The rules in this section apply to all Constructed tournaments.

    51. Previous Printings of Current Cards
    Players may include cards from previous printings if they appear in current card sets allowed in Constructed play by the appropriate game’s DCI Floor Rules (as long as they do not have features that create “marked” cards [see section 44]).

    52. Constructed-Format Deck Registration
    The head judge or tournament organizer may require players to register their decks and sideboards (if applicable) upon arrival at a tournament. Registration records the original composition of each deck. Once a tournament official receives a player’s decklist, the deck may not be altered. Failure to properly register a deck will result in the head judge applying the appropriate provisions of the DCI Penalty Guidelines.

    53. Multi-day Tournaments
    The list of cards and card sets that are tournament-legal on the first day of a multi-day tournament is the same for all days of that tournament.
    Example: The Magic: the Gathering card Skullclamp has been announced as banned in Standard effective June 20, 2004. If a multi-day Magic: the Gathering tournament is scheduled to start on June 18 and end on June 21, Skullclamp would be Standard-legal on any day of the tournament, including June 20 and 21.
    Example: The Magic: the Gathering card set Fifth Dawn becomes Standard-legal on June 20, 2004. If a multi-day Magic: the Gathering tournament is scheduled to start on June 18 and end on June 21, Fifth Dawn cards would not be Standard-legal for any day of the tournament, including June 20 and 21.

    60. GENERAL LIMITED-TOURNAMENT RULES
    The rules in this section apply to all Limited tournaments, including Sealed Deck (section 65) and Draft (section 70) tournaments.

    61. Limited-Format Deck Registration
    The head judge or tournament organizer may require players to record on a decklist every card they receive in a Limited tournament. Once the cards are registered, players have a limited amount of time to prepare their decks before play begins. Any cards players receive that are not used in their main decks are considered to be their sideboards. The DCI recommends (andrecommends, and in the case of enhanced K-values, the DCI requires)requires that organizers check a reasonable number of decks against their decklists each round.

    62. Card Use in Limited Tournaments
    Cards used in Limited events must be received directly from tournament officials. Players must have access to the same number of decks and/or booster packs from the same card set(s)This product must be new (previously unopened). Each player must be given the same quantity and type of product (decks and/or booster packs) as all the other players participating in the tournament.
    tournament. For example, if one player receives three Fifth Dawn boosters for a Booster Draft, all players must receive three Fifth Dawn boosters.

    Players may use only the actual cards they receive or draft at a Limited tournament, and any additional specifically provided by the tournament organizer (for example, basic lands in the Magic game). Players may not trade or replacethe cards they receive or draft at a Limited tournament with any other cards, even if the replacement is an exact copy. If a card is damaged or otherwise considered “marked,” players must comply with section 63, Abnormal Cards or Boosters.

    63. Abnormal Cards or Boosters
    Players who have an abnormal number of cards in the decks or booster packs they receive must inform the head judge, who may replace the deck or booster pack at his or her discretion in consultation with the tournament organizer. The head judge makes the final decision.

    If a player receives a “marked” card (section 44), the head judge may replace that card with a proxy card at his or her discretion. (See section 34—Proxy Cards)

    Neither Wizards of the Coast nor the tournament organizer guarantees any specific distribution of card rarities or frequency in a particular booster pack or deck.

    64. Early Departure
    Once a player in a Limited tournament has received sealed product, he or she may not withdraw from the event prior to the first match. Violation of this rule results in the offending participant receiving a loss for the match on the official tournament record (the opponent receives a win for the match) and being dropped from the tournament.

    65. GENERAL SEALED DECK–TOURNAMENT RULES
    Not all DCI-supported games feature Sealed Deck tournaments. Check the Limited Tournament Rules section of the specific game’s DCI Floor Rules for more information.

    66. Deck Construction
    Before tournament play begins, each player receives an assortment of sealed product. If decklists are being used, players have 20 minutes to register their decks. Each player then creates a tournament deck that meets the Sealed Deck size requirements found in the game’s DCI Floor Rules. Players have 30 minutes before the event begins to construct their decks.

    The head judge or tournament organizer may require players to record on a decklist every card they intend to play in their main decks and/or sideboards. Failure to properly record the cards being played in the main decks will result in the head judge applying the appropriate provisions of the DCI Penalty Guidelines.

    67. Sealed Deck Swap
    A Sealed Deck event may require participants to perform a sealed deck swap. In a sealed deck swap, players do not play with the decks they originally receive at the event. Instead, the sealed products—as well as deck-registration sheets—are handed out to all players in the event. Players open their decks and record the contents on their deck-registration sheets. This process is called “registering a deck,” and 20 minutes is allowed for it. Tournament officials will then collect the sealed product and the corresponding deck-registration sheets. Next, the tournament officials hand out decks randomly to all players. It is perfectly acceptable for some players to receive their original decks back at this point. This entire process is called a sealed deck swap. Players are then allowed 30 minutes to construct their decks (60 minutes for team events) from the product they have at that time.

    70. GENERAL DRAFT-TOURNAMENT RULES
    Not all DCI-sanctioned games feature Draft tournaments. Check the Limited Tournament Rules section of the specific game’s DCI Floor Rules for more information.

    71. Player Distribution
    Players assemble randomly into drafting circles (called pods) of roughly equal size at the discretion of the tournament organizer or head judge. A tournament official then distributes an equal amount ofidentical set of new booster packs to each player in the pod.

    Players within a pod may play only against other players within that pod.

    Players may not talk or communicate to others during a draft. As players draft the cards, they must place their cards in one orderly pile in front of them. Drafted cards may be reviewed only between the drafting of each pack.

    72. Draft Card Selection
    Before the tournament begins, the head judge must announce how much time each player has to select a card. If a player fails to select a card in the time given, it is considered a Procedural Error—Minor. If the player is unable or unwilling to select a card, he or she is suspended from drafting and must construct a deck from whatever cards he or she has drafted so far.

    73. Deck Construction
    Once drafting is complete, players have 30 minutes to build decks from the cards they selected. These decks must meet the Limited deck-size requirements specified by the appropriate game’s DCI Floor Rules. The head judge or tournament organizer may require players to record on a decklist every card they intend to use in their main decks, as well as all cards they drafted.

    74. Booster Draft Procedure
    Players may not take or receive any notes during a booster draft or during deck construction.

    At a signal from a tournament official, each player opens his or her booster pack specified by the official and counts the cards. If a player does not have the appropriate number of cards in his or her booster pack, he or she must immediately notify the judge, who will replace the pack. The player chooses one card from the booster pack, and then passes the remaining cards face down to the player on his or her left. The opened packs are passed around the drafting pod—with each player taking one card each before passing—until all cards are drafted.

    Once a player has removed a card from the pack and put it on the pile, it is considered selected and may not be returned to the pack. Players may not show their card selections or the contents of their current packs to other participants in the draft. Players are not permitted to send signals of any kind to other participants in the draft regarding any information about their own picks or what they want others to pick.

    After each player’s first pack is drafted, a tournament official will instruct players to open the next specified pack and draft in the same fashion, except that the direction of drafting is reversed—it now proceeds to the right. This process is repeated until all cards in all booster packs are drafted. For example, if five booster drafted.
    packs of Pokémon: Team Rocket™ cards were being drafted, the first, third, and fifth packs would be drafted clockwise (to each player’s left), and the second and fourth packs would be drafted counterclockwise (to each player’s right).

    Booster Draft Timing

    Cards remaining in pack Time allotted
    15 cards 40 seconds
    14 cards 40 seconds
    13 cards 35 seconds
    12 cards 35 seconds
    11 cards 30 seconds
    10 cards 30 seconds
    9 cards 25 seconds
    8 cards 25 seconds
    7 cards 20 seconds
    6 cards 20 seconds
    5 cards 15 seconds
    4 cards 15 seconds
    3 cards 10 seconds
    2 cards 10 seconds
    1 card N/A

    75. Rochester Draft Procedures
    Players may not take any notes during a Rochester draft or during deck construction.

    Once a player has indicated his or her drafting selection by touching a card, he or she may not select a different card.

    When packs are opened, they should be laid out in the center of the table in three rows.

    Before the tournament begins, the head judge must announce how much time each player has to select a card. If a player fails to select a card in the time given, the pod judge issues that player the “oldest” card still remaining from the booster pack.

    Example: The active player lays out cards from a booster pack. The cards are considered to be in chronological order (1–15), where 1 is the first (oldest) card placed on the table, and 15 is the last (newest) card placed on the table. If a player fails to draft in a timely manner, the cards on the table are examined by the pod judge, and the first card that was placed on the table is given to that player. If that card has already been selected, the second card that was placed on the table is given, and so on.

    During a Rochester draft, players must always display the most recent card they drafted in the current pack face up. When all cards are drafted from the current pack, players may move their cards from that pack to any position.

    76. Rochester Draft Table Preparation
    Booster packs are divided into groups before the draft table is set, with the number of packs in each group equaling the number of players participating in the draft. If the draft consists of packs from multiple card sets, each group must consist of packs from the same card set.

    In preparation for each pack being drafted, the active player lays out the entire contents of the pack face up on the table, with the cards facing him or her (see Section 77, Rochester Draft—Active Player Rotation). Players are given 30 seconds to review the cards before drafting begins.

    77. Rochester Draft—Active Player Rotation
    The player drafting first from the cards presented on the table is called the active player. The first active player is the participant in the first seat, designated by the judge. All players in each drafting pod serve as the active player once for each booster pack group (see Section 76, Rochester Draft Table Preparation), with the active player moving between players as follows:
     in a clockwise direction for the first booster pack group (beginning with the first active player);
     in a counterclockwise direction for the second booster pack group (starting with the last active player in the first group);
     and returning to a clockwise direction for the third booster pack group (beginning again with the first active player).

    78. Rochester Draft Order
    The draft order moves in a horseshoe pattern, beginning with the active player, continuing around the table to the last participant in the group who has not yet drafted a card. The last player in the group selects two cards, instead of one, and drafting continues in reverse order, moving back to the player who began the drafting (the first person who drafted from the pack). If there are still cards remaining, the player who began the drafting selects two cards, and drafting continues again in the opposite direction. (This will only occur with 6- and 7-player Rochester draft.) Once all cards have been drafted, the table judge prepares the drafting area for the next booster pack.

    Example #1: Eight players are seated around a table. They are numbered 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8 in a clockwise order. The active player is Player 1. The first booster pack for Player 1 is opened and placed face up in front of Player 1. After the 30-second review period has expired, the draft order is as follows:

    Player 1—card 1 Player 6—card 6 Player 6—card 11
    Player 2—card 2 Player 7—card 7 Player 5—card 12
    Player 3—card 3 Player 8—card 8 Player 4—card 13
    Player 4—card 4 Player 8—card 9 Player 3—card 14
    Player 5—card 5 Player 7—card 10 Player 2—card 15

    The next pack to be opened would be Player #2’s first booster.

    Example #2: Seven players are seated around a table. They are numbered 1-2-3-4-5-6-7 in a clockwise order. The active player is Player 1. The first booster pack for Player 1 is opened and placed face up in front of Player 1. After the 30-second review period has expired, the draft order is as follows:

    Player 1—card 1 Player 6—card 6 Player 4—card 11
    Player 2—card 2 Player 7—card 7 Player 3—card 12
    Player 3—card 3 Player 7—card 8 Player 2—card 13
    Player 4—card 4 Player 6—card 9 Player 1—card 14
    Player 5—card 5 Player 5—card 10 Player 1—card 15

    The next pack to be opened would be Player #2’s first booster.

    80. DCI SANCTIONING RULES
    Tournament organizers must follow the rules in this section when sanctioning events with the DCI. The DCI reserves the right to cancel sanctioning for any eventor invalidate a DCI-sanctioned tournament at any time.

    81. Participation Minimums
    For select games, the DCI requires a minimum amount of player participation for the eventA minimum number of players are required to play in a DCI-sanctioned tournament for its results to be included in the appropriate set of ratings and rankings. These minimums are as follows:listed in each game's respective floor rules.

    Magic: The Gathering and Star Wars
    For singles events, a minimum of eight players must participate.
    For team events, a minimum of four teams must participate.

    A minimum of four players must participate in tournaments for any other DCI-sanctioned game.

    90. EVENT-REPORTING RULES
    Receiving event reports in a correct and timely manner is fundamental to accurate and up-to-date DCI ratings. Tournament organizers must follow the rules outlined in this section when reporting their events.

    91. Organizer Records
    Tournament organizers are required to keep copies of all tournament reports for DCI-sanctioned events they run for a period of one year. one year. A tournament report includes all match results, as well as player warnings and disqualifications.

    These records serve as backups in case event results are lost.

    92. Event Report Deadline
    Event reports are due to the DCI within eight days of a tournament’s conclusion in order to allow for processing and data-entry. Events that have not had resultsconclusion. Events results not checked into the DCI database are listed as "Not Received" for fourteen days after the date of the event.

    93. Delinquent Tournaments
    Event reports not received within fourteen days are listed as “Delinquent” in the DCI tournament database. Organizers with delinquent tournaments may lose the privilege of sanctioning future events.

    94. Invalid Tournaments
    Players’ match records at events that become invalid will not count toward their DCI ratings and rankings.

    The DCI reserves the right to invalidate reported results of any DCI-sanctioned tournament for any reason, but will usually do so only when fraudulent or incorrect results are reported by the organizer. Additionally, the DCI reserves the right to invalidate any event reports not received within thirty days of the tournament date.

    95. Event-StatusEvent Status Updates
    Tournament organizers and players may check on an event’s reporting status by visiting the DCI website at thedci.com. Additionally, the DCI sends regular updates to organizers informing them of the status of each of their sanctioned tournaments. If an organizer’s event appears as “Delinquent” or “Invalid” on this report two months in a row, the DCI will investigate the organizer’s reporting history and issue sanctioning penalties as appropriate.

    The DCI reserves the right to adjust penalties on an individual basis due to extenuating circumstances and it reserves the right to change this policy without notice.

    96. Mandatory DCI Numbers
    Tournament participants must be assigned a DCI membership number prior to participating in a DCI-sanctioned tournament. Results reported with temporary player numbers, player names, or placeholders will not be included in DCI ratings. Membership cards may not be faxed to the DCI.

    97. Tournament Reports and Event Invitation Lists
    Tournament reports must be received by the deadlines specified in the Ratings Deadline and Publication Schedules provided on the DCI website (thedci.com) in order to be included in the ratings calculations used to generate invitation and bye lists for premier events.

    APPENDIX A—DCI RATING AND RANKING SYSTEMS

    Elo Ratings System
    The DCI produces Elo ratings for the following games:all games it supports (see section 2 for a complete list of games)
    • Magic: The Gathering trading card game

    The Elo player-rating system compares players’ match records against their opponents’ match records and determines the probability of the player winning the matchup. This probability factor determines how many points a players’ ratings gorating goes up or down based on the results of each match. When a player defeats an opponent with a higher rating, the player’s rating goes up more than if he or she defeated a player with a lower rating (since players should defeat opponents who have lower ratings). All new players start out with a base rating of 1600. The DCI uses the following equation to determine a player’s win probability in each match:

    1
    Win Probability = --------------------------------------------------------------
    10^((Opponent’s Rating–Player’s Rating)/400) + 1

    This probability is then used to recalculate each player’s rating after the match. In the equation below, players receive 1 point if they win the match, 0 if they lose, and 0.5 for a draw. Players’ new ratings are determined as follows:

    Player’s New Rating = Player’s Old Rating + (K-Value * (Scoring Points–Player’s Win Probability))

    All players are rated at the beginning with the first match in which they play. Further ratings are calculated chronologically from that first match.

    The DCI ranks players in geographic regions (continent, country, state, city, and so on) based on their Elo ratings to determine the top players in each area.


    APPENDIX B—DEFINITIONS OF TERMS

    Ante Card: Ante cards have the text “Remove [this card] from your deck before playing if you’re not playing for ante.” These cards usually have a game mechanic associated with a player “anteing” a card. Ante cards are found mainly in older Magic: The Gathering expansions and are not allowed in tournament play.

    Banned Card: A card that is prohibited by the DCI in the indicated format. For example, the card Chaos Orb is banned from DCI-sanctioned Type 1 Magic tournaments. This means that Chaos Orb is not allowed in any deck in Type 1 Constructed Magic tournaments.

    Constructed: A tournament in which players bring their own decks. Decks are built from a large pool of cards, depending on the exact format.

    Corporate Employee: Any person whose place of employment is a Wizards of the Coast or Hasbro office.

    Cutting: One time only, removing a single portion of a deck and placing it on top of the remaining portion without looking at any of the card faces. Anything more than this one cut is considered a shuffle.

    DCI: Organization dedicated to developing and maintaining tournament structures for trading card and miniatures games. Formerly an acronym for Duelists’ Convocation International, the name is now simply the DCI.

    Enhanced-K Tournament: In events for games that use Elo ratings (see appendix A), organizers may pick from a specified list of K-values to increase or limit the effect of match results on player ratings. Tournaments must meet certain criteria in order to receive an enhanced K-value.

    Employee: Any person whose regular place of employment is at a Wizards of the Coast or Hasbro corporate office.

    Game Begins: A game is considered to have begun once all players have presented their decks to their opponents for shuffling/cutting.

    Head Judge Determines: Decision based on the head judge’s opinion.

    Immediate Family: For purposes of DCI rules, the immediate family is considered to be 1) any family member living in the same household as the employee or 2) a child of the employee.

    K-Value: The maximum number of points a player’s rating may go up or down based on the results of a single match within an event that uses the Elo ratings system (see appendix A).

    Limited: A tournament in which players build their decks at the tournament from cards they have drafted or opened from packs. The three most common Limited formats are Sealed Deck, Booster Draft, and Rochester Draft.

    Main Deck: The deck a player presents to his or her opponent during the first game of a match.

    Match: A series of games between two players or teams that determines a winner. In many cases, the match winner defeats his or her opponent in a best-two-out-of-three-games series. See the appropriate game’s DCI Floor Rules for morespecific details.

    Match Begins: A match begins when a tournament official announces the start of the match.

    Premier Events: Any event that Wizards of the Coast runs itself or offers only to select tournament organizers or that is open only to a select group of players (based on invitations, for example). Examples of Premier Events: Magic: The Gathering Pro Tour events,Premier events can include, but are not limited to: Amateur Championships, European Championships, Friday Night Magic events, Grand Prix tournaments,Grand Prix Trials, Japanese Finals, High School Championships, Junior Super Series Challenges,Magic: The Gathering Pro Tour events, Masters Series events, Gateway tournaments, Pro Tour Qualifiers,Regional Championships, State/Province/Island/Territory Championships, and World Championships.

    Promo Card: Any playable card that is released by the manufacturer separate of any given card set.

    Proxy Card: A card used during competition to represent another card (also counterfeit cards or any card that is not genuinely produced by the game’s manufacturer).

    Public Information: Refers to information that is available to all players in the match, such as statistics or card text that participants are required to share with tournament officials and opponents according to the rules of the appropriate game. For example, in most games, the number of cards in a player’s hand is public information.

    Rating: A numeric value published by the DCI that indicates a player’s past performance in sanctioned tournaments.

    Ranking: A value, based on a player’s DCI rating, that indicates a player’s position relative to the group he or she is being measured against. For example, a player may be ranked in first place in the city of Hamburg, Germany, but may be ranked in eighty-fifth place when compared to all of Europe.

    Restricted Card: A card that is limited by the DCI to one per deck in the indicated format. For example, the card Black Lotus is restricted in DCI-sanctioned Type 1 Magic tournaments. This means that only one Black Lotus is allowed per deck in the Type 1 format.

    Round: The period during which match play takes place.

    Round Begins: The time posted and/or announced by the head judge or tournament organizer for all players to be seated and ready for match play.

    Scorekeeper: The scorekeeper is a tournament official whose responsibilities include receiving and recording all match/game results, constructing player seatings, ensuring accurate entry of match/game results, withdrawing players from the event, and so on. Tournament officials, such as the head judge or tournament organizer, may also be the scorekeeper for the event.

    Single Elimination: A competition structure that eliminates players after one match loss. It may be necessary to award byes in the first round to create a situation in which there will be only two undefeated participants playing off in the last round of the event.

    Swiss Rounds: Competition structure that allows players to participate in every round of the tournament. Single-elimination final rounds may follow Swiss rounds in some tournaments.

    Tournament Begins: Once the onsite tournament registration closes, the tournament has begun.

    Tournament Official: Any person who is empowered to maintain the tournament. This includes, but is not limited to, the tournament organizer, scorekeeper, other scorekeeping staff, head judge, and all other judges(see section 10).

    Star Wars © 2002 Lucasfilm Ltd. & TM. All rights reserved.
    Major League Baseball trademarks and copyrights are used with permission of Major League Baseball Properties, Inc. ©MLBPA Official Licensee—Major League Baseball Players Association
    ©2002 NFL Properties, Inc.
    ©The F.A. Premier League Ltd. 2002
    Wizards of the Coast, The Game Keeper, Magic: The Gathering, Magic, Chainmail, Subbuteo Football Champions, Showdown,DCI, MAGIC: THE GATHERING PRO TOUR, and Oracle are trademarks of Wizards of the Coast, Inc. ©2002 Wizards.


    Junior Super Series Championships, Dungeon and Dragons Miniatures Championship, National Championships, Prerelease tournaments, Pro Tour Qualifiers, MLB Championships, Regional Championships, Star Wars Championship, and World Championships.

    Promo Card: Any playable card that is released by the manufacturer separate of any given card set.

    Proxy Card: A card used during competition to represent another card (also counterfeit cards or any card that is not genuinely produced by the game’s manufacturer).

    Public Information: Refers to information that is available to all players in the match, such as statistics or card text that participants are required to share with tournament officials and opponents according to the rules of the appropriate game. For example, in most games, the number of cards in a player’s hand is public information.

    Rating: A numeric value published by the DCI that indicates a player’s past performance in sanctioned tournaments.

    Ranking: A value, based on a player’s DCI rating, that indicates a player’s position relative to the group he or she is being measured against. For example, a player may be ranked in first place in the city of Hamburg, Germany, but may be ranked in eighty-fifth place when compared to all of Europe.

    Restricted Card: A card that is limited by the DCI to one per deck in the indicated format. For example, the card Black Lotus is restricted in DCI-sanctioned Type 1 Magic tournaments. This means that only one Black Lotus is allowed per deck, including sideboard, in the Type 1 format.

    Round: The period during which match play takes place.

    Round Begins: The time posted and/or announced by the head judge or tournament organizer for all players to be seated and ready for match play.

    Scorekeeper: The scorekeeper is a tournament official whose responsibilities include receiving and recording all match/game results, constructing player seatings, ensuring accurate entry of match/game results, withdrawing players from the event, and so on. Tournament officials, such as the head judge or tournament organizer, may also be the scorekeeper for the event.

    Single Elimination: A competition structure that eliminates players after one match loss. It may be necessary to award byes in the first round to create a situation in which there will be only two undefeated participants playing off in the last round of the event.

    Swiss Rounds: Competition structure that allows players to participate in every round of the tournament. Single-elimination final rounds may follow Swiss rounds in some tournaments.

    Tournament Begins: Once the onsite tournament registration closes, the tournament has begun.

    Tournament Official: Any person who is empowered to maintain the tournament. This includes, but is not limited to, the tournament organizer, scorekeeper, other tournament staff, head judge, and all other judges (certified and non-certified). (see section 10).

    APPENDIX C— CHANGES FROM PREVIOUS VERSIONS

    Changes from April 1, 2004 version
    Header: Reference to Tournament Season removed.
    Section 2: Games list updated.
    Section 3: List of non-eligible players clarified to include all tournament officials for that event (also see changes to Appendix B).
    Section 13: Clarifies that players are responsible for reporting errors in their match history. Clarifies that players are responsible for following the instructions of a tournament official.
    Section 28. Clarifies that spectators may not take notes during drafts. Clarifies that modifications to a card may be considered by the Head Judge as unsporting conduct.
    Section 42: Unsporting conduct includes failure to follow the instructions of a tournament official.
    Section 53: Section added.
    Section 62. Clarifies that product distributed in a Limited event must be new. Clarifies that each player must receive identical product in a Limited event.
    Section 74: Adds that players may not receive notes during a booster draft or during deck construction.
    Section 80: Clarifies that the DCI may invalidate a tournament.
    Section 81: Participation minimums moved to game floor rules.
    Section 91: Adds player warnings and disqualification as part of what constitutes a tournament report.
    Appendix A: Game list updated.
    Appendix B: Definitions revised.
    Appendix C: Section added (Changes From Previous Versions)


    Star Wars © 2004 Lucasfilm Ltd. & TM. All rights reserved.
    Major League Baseball trademarks and copyrights are used with permission of Major League Baseball Properties, Inc. ©MLBPA Official Licensee—Major League Baseball Players Association
    ©The F.A. Premier League Ltd. 2004
    Duel Masters are TM and © 2004 Wizards of the Coast/Shogakukan/Mitsui-Kids.
    Wizards of the Coast, Magic: The Gathering, Magic, Chainmail, Football Champions, Showdown, Dungeon and Dragons, Dungeon and Dragons Miniatures, DCI, MAGIC: THE GATHERING PRO TOUR, and Oracle are trademarks of Wizards of the Coast, Inc. ©2004 Wizards.
  4. Notepad Seffy Sefro

    A million thanks, Chaos Turtle!!! :D :D :D

    Now I can work on my article "Breakin Da Rules"...wait, that's a title for an episode of Fairly Odd Parents. Better rework that...

    (Gonna be about alternative tournament formats/rules that are based on all the sound reasons for the DCI's own rules--by breaking them.)
  5. train The Wildcard!!!...

    why not just break these - legally...
  6. Notepad Seffy Sefro

    Legally break? I have no idea what you mean. Could you ellaborate?
  7. train The Wildcard!!!...

    In order to hinder the shuffling process, and not be penalized...

    you can legally use rule 35...

    35. Card Sleeves
    Players may use plastic card sleeves or other protective devices on cards. If a player chooses to use card sleeves, all cards in the player’s current deck must be placed in the sleeves in an identical manner. If the sleeves feature holograms or other similar markings, cards must be inserted into the sleeves so these markings appear only on the face of the cards.

    Simply use the harder plastics to protect them - you know the top-loaders...

    ;)

    That kind of breaking...:D :cool:
  8. Notepad Seffy Sefro

    How is using top-loading hard cases breaking the rules? It is ridiculous to shuffle, yes, but it doesn't seem like anything that would constitute a rules infraction (unless the judge is having a bad day).

    What I am talking about is totally ignoring things like "no extra cards on the playing surface." When I finally get to writing that article, you'd see the screwball ideas I have. Until then, may work waste all my free time!
  9. Spiderman CPA Man in Tights, Dopey Administrative Assistant

    Although it wasn't clear from his first post, from his second, I think train means "breaking" as not the rules, but physically the top loaders since they're so stiff. He was trying to be funny, methinks... :)
  10. Notepad Seffy Sefro

    Ah, in that case--funny! Breakin da rulez...the literal way. :D :D

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